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On Reading The Butterfly Mosque

August 2, 2012

Title: The Butterfly Mosque: A Young American Woman’s Journey to Love and Islam

Author: G. Willow Wilson

Publication Date: August 2010

Genre:  Autobiography

Source: Local library

This startlingly lovely book gracefully and tentatively walks the tightrope between being a gentle narrative and a grimly realistic testimony to the growing divide between the East and West.

It’s not inaccurate to say that this book is about a woman’s conversion to Islam, her move to Egypt, her marriage to an Egyptian Muslim, and her struggle to come to terms with the American/Muslim/Egyptian dimensions of her existence. I feel, however, that even that description alone does a disservice to this story. There are so many ways Wilson could have written a book that fits this description. The precise way she wrote it and her specific treatment of her subject matter, however, are what make this book a must-read for both Muslims and non-Muslims. Here is what makes it so:

  • The Muslim and non-Muslim reader of this book is on equal footing. I’m ashamed to admit this, but I assumed that I was not the kind of reader Wilson was writing for. I thought that her treatment of Islam’s tenets and history would be very basic, and that this would be a mere readable and feel-good record of her cultural immersion. I was so glad to be proven wrong: her account and writing can be revelatory for readers of all faiths. She remarks, for example, on the fact that the Islamic calendar are not fixed, and therefore occasions like Eid can occur during any season, reflecting that God does not want us to worship nature or become to attached to the material, even if it is through associating a certain type of season with a holiday. Such a description is only one example of how she can introduce a fact about Islam while introducing a refreshing perspective for a practicing Muslim.
  • The author is very honest about her romantic relationship and her struggle with it. I loved this honesty, which is more heartfelt than raw, and I loved how she is very upfront about the realities of loving someone from a vastly different background. It isn’t for no reason that love blossoms between Wilson and the man who would become her husband: they are passionate about Islam, about Egypt, about art and spirituality, and both are anomalies in respect to their indigenous cultures. He is amazingly tender towards her (he’s so dreamy) and they have a beautiful wedding. I really, appreciated, however, how Wilson makes a point that love stories, even in memoirs, often miss out on: love is a struggle. The more disparate your backgrounds, the greater a struggle it is. She writes: “Love is not a benign thing. No corner of my life remained unaltered by the consequences of what I loved. The most wonderful thing that had ever happened to me brought me neither peace nor comfort. But it did bring me Omar. And that was more than enough.”
  •  She gives a similar treatment to the Egyptians and Iranians portrayed in the book. All too aware that she does not speak for them, she carefully presents their attitudes and norms without apology and with careful explanation from within the cultural framework. In fact, she goes even further by posing some striking perspectives when it comes to being a woman in an Egyptian society:

When people wonder why Arab women defend their culture, they focus on the way women who don’t follow the rules are punished, and fail to consider the way women who do follow the rules are rewarded. When I finished an article or essay, all I received was an e-mail from an editor saying, ‘Thanks, got it.’ When I cooked an iftar meal during Ramadan, a dozen tender voices blessed my hands.

  • Her description of Cairo is magnificent. Really, I’m at a loss to explain what made it so wonderful. I’ll only say that if I ever visit the city, I’ll make a point of re-reading the book and mapping out the monuments, buildings, and cafes she describes. I also greatly admire her for refusing to life the insulated life of an expat in the city and getting as close as she could to experiencing life as an Egyptian woman.
  • This, a passage that made me experience a deep sense of kinship that had me reeling for days:

In her book The Trouble with Islam, Irshad Manji smugly announces that . . . ‘it was Islam’s job’ to keep her from leaving the faith. I never thought it was Islam’s job to keep me. My faith was not a contract, not a deal; there were no clauses I expected God to abide by and which, if violated, would give me an excuse to back out. . . It was certainty that animated me; it was certainty that allowed me to watch the progress of the extremists and feel anger and disgust, but never disappointment. It was not my place to be approving or disappointed: I had submitted too completely for either. Through the bile and ignorance of the radical imams and self-righteous apostates, through the spin of the news networks and the pomposity of academics, I saw a straight, unwavering line. How could I be disappointed? I did not believe in Islam; I opened my eyes every morning and saw it.

I have often wondered how it is that I could be confronted with a stream of staunch disbelievers, radically liberal reformists, and pathological conservatives and still believe. I now understand, for Wilson articulates in this passage what I could not put words to even after years of thought.

I don’t think it’s very often that one can get the kind of nuance and beauty in nonfiction this book offers, especially in nonfiction about transnational Muslims. By sharing her story, Wilson gives sensitively and remarkably-framed insights into the struggles of Egypt, the real struggle for the soul of Islam, and the turmoil that comes with being a Muslim who is forever battling the opposing sides of her cultural and spiritual heritage.

Notes:

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14 Comments leave one →
  1. Irendi permalink
    August 2, 2012 1:41 pm

    Excellent review! I have paged through the reviews on Amazon a few times, always placing it in my cart and backing out at the last minute. Now, I REALLY want to read it.

    • August 2, 2012 2:19 pm

      It’s so funny you should say this…I had the same experience in the bookstore! I literally spent half an hour looking for the book, found it, but then ended up backing out as well. Now I wish I had gone ahead and bought it! 🙂

  2. August 2, 2012 4:02 pm

    I read this last year and love it. I was hoping that there was a used copy with reasonable price that I could buy for keep. As a convert, I relate to what Wilson said. Your first quote for on appreciative Muslim family can have for their family members is the same one that I have quoted on my blog. Great review, thanks!

    • August 2, 2012 6:27 pm

      Nice review yourself! I like your roundup of quotes from the book, especially the one about Jhumpa Lahiri’s description of living in a foreign country.

  3. saba permalink
    August 2, 2012 11:45 pm

    Great review. I read it in June and recommended it to everyone around me. Canèt wait to read her new novel, Alif the Unseen.

    • August 3, 2012 1:33 am

      Me neither, I’m on the waitlist for the ebook from the library!

  4. August 28, 2012 11:56 am

    Amazing review, you have added this book to my wishlist. It sounds like she touches so much, in such a fantastic way. I’m especially intrigued by her descriptions of Cairo, a city which I loved!

    • August 28, 2012 12:44 pm

      Lucky you for having seen Cairo! If you loved the city you would, without a doubt, love this book.

  5. January 18, 2013 12:01 am

    Wow, beautiful review Sarah. I will have to add yet another book to my to-read list. That list is getting quite long haha.

  6. July 9, 2013 11:11 am

    Thanks for your insightful review. I liked the book a great deal, too, but I am in her target audience. I look forward to learning what you think of other books that include Moslim women.

    • July 14, 2013 5:07 pm

      Thank you and thanks for the linkback! I’m glad the review resonated with you.

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